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Shade Taking

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Shade Taking

Shade Taking

Shade Taking
Shade Taking

Using the "From Nature To Ceramics" prescription form predictable results can be achieved but first we need to understand the principles of light and colour.

Shade taking – Good Light Source

Shade taking – Good Light Source

The best time of the day to take a shade is 10am or 2pm on a sunny day.

We can duplicate these conditions with colour corrected operating lights and colour corrected overhead fluorescent lights.

We use Phillips 95 bulbs.

Shade Taking

Language of Colour

  • Hue – Colour e.g. orange
  • Chroma – Intensity e.g. dark orange
  • Value – White, grey, black
  • High value – B1
  • Low value – C4
Language of Colour

Language of Colour

Translucency – with age the particle sizes of the tooth structure enlarge and teeth become more translucent. Photo at the top shows smaller pieces of glass as white and larger pieces as translucent.

Language of Colour

Language of Colour

Fluorescence – teeth fluoresce under ultraviolet light and change colour under varying lighting conditions. Ultraviolet light is present under all lighting conditions, stronger at midday than in the morning, stronger under black lights e.g. at a night club than incandescent lights e.g. at home.

Language of Colour

Language of Colour

Opalescence – opalescent teeth reflect blue light and transmit red light. Young peoples’ teeth opalesce more than old peoples’ teeth as the particle sizes in the tooth structure of young people are smaller and the short, high wavelength of blue light cannot pass through.

With good photography and a basic shade the results can
be just about as good as using a complex shade prescription.

using a complex shade

1997 replaced 21 implant crown. Shade A2 body, D2 incisal. Dentist sent 35mm slide.

Crown

Crown made with no other information than a base shade and slide.

2005 dentist emailed digital photograph.

2005 dentist emailed digital photograph.

Shade prescription form not provided.

Shade prescription form not provided.

Minimum shade requirement for Team Niho.

Minimum shade requirement for Team Niho.

Step 1 – Base Shade

Step 1 – Base Shade (Outline)

Identify base shade, value, chroma and hue with shade guide or colour spectrometer. When doing multi restorations may alter the shade to match patient’s expectations while maintaining harmony with surrounding teeth.

Step 2 – Fluorescence

Step 2 – Fluorescence

Note colour of gingival area with EL fluorescent tabs. This is critical as this area of the tooth is always fluorescent and will change colour under different lighting conditions. Fluorescent ceramics used in this area will change colour the same as a tooth.

Step 3 – Underlying Shade/Stump Colour

Step 3 – Underlying Shade/Stump Colour

Note the colour of the stump using a natural dentine (ND) shade guide. This is critical in all-ceramic work as the colour of the stump may show through if not compensated for by the technician.

Step 4 -  Translucency/Glassiness of Tooth

Step 4 - Translucency/Glassiness of Tooth

Note the translucency/glassiness of the tooth, firstly the body and then the incisal half. A glassy tooth is one you can look into and a dense tooth is quite opaque.

Halfway between dense and glassy is the same as the shade guide. This is critical as it records the overall depth of translucency of the tooth and prevents the restoration appearing too bright or too low in value (grey).

Step 5 – Incisal Shade

Step 5 – Incisal Shade

If the incisal zone is different to that in the shade guide note it in the tick boxes. Quite often you may tick more than one box e.g. the tooth is greyer and oranger than the shade guide.

Step 6 – Incisal Edge (Outline shape)

Step 6 – Incisal Edge (Outline shape)

  • Outline the shape of the transparent/translucent aspect of the incisal edge
  • If non-translucent i.e. neither transparent or translucent there is no need to draw an outline, simply tick the box as in this case.

Step 7 – Incisal Edge

  • No dominant colour
Step 6 – Incisal Edge (Outline shape)

Step 6 – Incisal Edge (Outline shape)

  • If as in this case there is a transparent or translucent edge draw an outline. 
  • Transparent is like clear glass.  Translucent is like frosted glass. 
  • In this case the incisal edge was translucent.

Step 7 – Incisal Edge

  • Note the dominant colour and tick the appropriate box. 
  • This is critical as it indicates the opalescent quality of the tooth.

Shade Taking

Shade Taking

Step 8 – Other Qualities of the Tooth

Record other qualities of the tooth e.g. secondary dentine, mamelons, enamel cracks, halo and discolourations.

Note surface lustre - glossy, standard or matt, standard being as per the shade guide and texture - heavy, medium or polished, medium being as per the shade guide.

Step 9 – Shade Prescription and Photo

Step 9 – Shade Prescription and Photo

Double check everything has been filled out and send to Team Niho..

Completed case.

Completed case. Even though not exactly the same shade as the original teeth the veneers are still in harmony with the surrounding teeth.